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Lego Star Wars III: The Clone Wars Guide

Lego Star Wars III: The Clone Wars Walkthrough and Guide
 
 


Lego Star Wars III: The Clone Wars Walkthrough

Unofficial Lego Star Wars III: The Clone Wars Guide by Chris Boots-Faubert for SuperCheats.com


 



This guide was written for the Xbox 360 version of the game, but it applies to all of the platforms and will be useful on them.  The hand-held game version is slightly different than the console version, but not so substantially that this guide is less useful.

The LEGO line of video games are widely enjoyed by all age ranges, and may well have more adult fans than children -- the reason for that has more to do with the subjects of the video games, practically all of which have previously been given a more serious game treatment -- and that is the point really. 

LEGO Star Wars III: The Clone Wars is a lot like the Harry Potter games from the series, because it tells a story that we already know and love, providing the chance for us to relive our favorite bits from the animated series in about as non-threatening a way as you can imagine.

Before we get to the meat of the Introduction, we need to talk about game play elements of this game because I fear that if we do not, and you are not an experienced hand of the LEGO series, you will find yourself very confused, very quickly, with the sort of confusion that can and often does lead to game frustration -- and considering how wicked fun these games are, that really would be a shame.

If you are unfamiliar with this game series, it is structured for game play by up to two players who can switch between different characters in order to fight enemies, solve puzzles, and progress through the levels.  This style can be confusing for new players because while it appears to be the standard linear game play approach, in reality it is anything but that!

You will find in playing through the story mode that there are areas and items that you simply cannot reach because you do not have the proper characters or skills.  That is not an accident, and you have done nothing wrong -- it is simply that you are not intended to obtain those items or access those areas as part of the story mode!  No, in fact you will need to return to, and replay, those levels in free play mode, once you have unlocked the characters that are required to complete all of the various parts in them.

The reason for that is that in free play mode you can switch between characters on-the-fly, which means that, for example, an area that requires a Dark Force character or a droid will be accessible in free play as long as you have one of that type available to use by unlocking them in game play or through purchasing them in-game!

LEGO games traditionally include a few special features in play, like scene swaps, where players can switch between teams in separate locations to complete multi-part objectives, and challenging boss battles that are often more humorous than they are dangerous. There is such a variety of play in these games that they are sure to appeal to any fan of their subject -- from space flight and battles to real-time strategy engagements during which you command large ground armies on massive battlefields!

This newest entry in the series is unique compared to the previous titles for several reasons, and not the least of which being that it is built on an entirely new graphics engine with much more beefy object handling code!  That may sound odd to you if you are playing the game on a console, because you know that the hardware in your console is not new, and so you may wonder how it can be all that much improved.  Well that is the magic of game making, mate, so you will just have to take our word for it!

OK fine, be that way!  The secret is simple -- the code that was used to build this game is tighter and much more efficient, which means that it more fully employs the graphic capabilities of your console, and can handle a much higher count of objects on the screen at any given moment.  One very obvious element in addition to tighter pixel grouping is the creative use of light and shadow in the game.

Believe it when we say that the LEGO series is a top-of-the-line cutting-edge AAA Rated game series, and the games that are part of it are not created to disappoint! 

If you have played the previous titles in the LEGO Star Wars series, you are no doubt used to the hub in the game being centered around either a land-based structure, or an interior element of the space station.  That is not the case in LSW3:CW, as this game's hub is located on a star ship!  What does that mean in terms of game play?  Why it means that your hub is portable, and so you are able to move about in the galaxy while retaining that familiar space!  That is a good thing too, because as you no doubt are aware, the story of the Clone Wars spans distant planets, different star systems, and broad and empty patches of stellar real estate!

Now that we have covered the important background and thus provided you with a solid grounding on the major game elements, we shall return to the proper Introduction!
 
The LEGO Star Wars series is based off of two iconic pieces of entertainment -- the animated series The Clone Wars, and the eponymous toy line created by the Lego Group based on the Star Wars movies.

The bloodlines of the series are honest and deep, and they begin with LEGO Star Wars, the Video Game, which was released in March of 2005 for the Nintendo Game Boy Advance,  Nintendo GameCube, Sony PlayStation 2, and Microsoft's Xbox console and, much later,  for Windows PC.

The first game in the series established it.  That may sound rather obvious, but what you are thinking is not what we mean.   LEGO Star Wars, the Video Game did more for the games that followed than simply establish the format and appearance, it also set the standard for quality and self-depreciating humor of the sort that leaves you without any doubt that when you do something stupid -- and you will do stupid things -- the game is laughing with you, and not at you.  An important distinction.

The establishing game was followed by LEGO Star Wars II: The Original Trilogy in September of 2006, then LEGO Star Wars, the Complete Saga in May 2007.  In October of 2009 LEGO Star Wars: the Quest for R2-D2 was released as a free online game, and while many purists insist that as it was a freebie it does not properly belong in the official canon, our response to that is bullocks!   And with that sentiment, and that game, we come full circle to the most recent offering, LEGO Star Wars III: the Clone Wars, which was released on March 22nd, 2011, and about which this guide is written!

I have played all of these games, and many of them on multiple platforms, simply because they are fun and easily number among the most entertaining games available today.  If it appears that I speak of them with a robust enthusiasm, why, that is because I do indeed feel that way about them.  I have spent many hours playing -- and re-playing -- their various levels.

Moving on, and lastly, this guide is carefully and logically structured to be as useful to you as it can be, and is written with great detail and intense care to provide the information that you need to get your bearings no matter how deep into a level you are when you go looking for help!  Now, how cool is that?

So having covered all of the ground that we really needed to cover, and some that was more or less optional but that I thought were a good idea, all that is left is for me to tell you that you are about to embark upon an adventure filled with danger, excitement, and challenges galore! 

In spite of the fact that this is technically a game that is aimed at children, as an adult gamer you are going to need this guide badly at some points, because though packed with joy the trappings of the game world will lull you into a false sense of security until, BAM!  You end up lost and in need of direction!

Well that is why I am here mate!  So relax, don't panic, I've got your back!



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